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Domus India Cover

APRIL 2019 Issue





 
16
Editorial
Text by Kaiwan Mehta
18
Tribute
Alessandro the Great
Alessandro Mendini
Milan, 16.08.1931 - 18.02.2019
Text by Walter Mariotti
20
Books
Celestial Stories
On Tom Gauld’s ‘Mooncop’
Text and photos by Aparna Andhare
24
Indian Aesthetics
The Maidoms of Charaideo in Assam
Text and photos by Sudha Ganapathi
30
Exhibition
A conflict of life and death
An exhibition on the works of artist
Yardena Karulkar
Text by Gita Chadha
40
Photo Essay
Ceilings
Text and photos by Ritesh Uttamchandani
44
Nurture Visions
Posters Unite!
A collective project by Group 2020
and Artists Unite
48
Architecture
Artefact in a neighbourhood
Narayantala Thakurdalan
Bansberia, West Bengal
Project by Abin Design Studio
Text by Kaiwan Mehta
60
Domus Milan
A new world map
Text by Winy Maas
62
Urbanism
Infrastructure as foreign policy
Belt and Road Initiative
World
Text by Jason Hilgefort
Photos by Davide Monteleone
72
Urbanism
Planet Europe
Two post-Brexit scenarios
World
Texts Francesco Cancellato, Stephan Petermann
80
Discussion
The open city
ADM Amsterdam
Interview with Richard Sennett
World
Text by Winy Maas, Rory Stott
Photos by Charly Kurz, Gangfeng Wan
86
Landscape
Eating the crust
Landscapes of extraction
World
Text by Stephanie Carlisle, Nicholas Pevzner
Photos by J Henry Fair, Robyn Beck, Romy Arroyo
Fernandez, Henning Kaiser
96
Urbanism
Stealing the coast
The future Lagos
Lagos, Nigeria
Text by Mathias Agbo Jr., Jareh Das
Photos by Peeter Viisimaa, George Osodi,
Yann Arthus-Bertrand
102
Architecture
Desert world wonder
National Museum of Qatar
Doha, Qatar
Project by Jean Nouvel — Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Photo by Iwan Baan
104
Event
Instant Megalopolis
Kumbh Mela 2019
Allahabad
Text, research and infographics by Rahul Mehrotra,
Felipe Vera, Stefano Andreani
110
Rassegna
Colour , form and material
Presented by Giulia Guzzini
About the cover:
Designed by Abin Design Studio, the cover highlights the location of a temple-shrine for a community in the busy town of Bansberia in West Bengal. The design for this temple produces a certain kind of non-form — a simple and humble rectangular box, with two of its adjacent sides removed and partly converted into a jali. More importantly, the design of the temple responds to the idea of a neighbourhood. The temple-shrine here is meant to define a street corner, and in a way it articulates its presence very strongly within an urban fabric, making itself an urban artefact. For more details, turn to page 48.
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