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Domus India Cover

MAY 2019 Issue





 
14
Editorial
Text by Kaiwan Mehta
16
Tribute
Darryl D’monte
1944 — 2019
Text by Kalpana Sharma
18
Books
Long, sunlit days
On Karl Ove Knaugaard’s ‘Summer’
Text and photos by Aparna Andhare
22
Indian Aesthetics
The Neelkanth Mahadev Temple of Alwar, Rajasthan
Text and photos by Anuradha Shankar
28
Biennale
Possibilities for a Non-Alienated Life
Kochi-Muziris Biennale
Text by Anita Dube, Kaiwan Mehta
Photos courtesy Kochi Biennale Foundation
46
Design
Koodaaram: the Pavillion at Cabral Yard, Kochi
Anagram Architects
Text by Kaiwan Mehta, Anita Dube, Madhav Raman
Photos courtesy Anagram Architects
58
Exhibition
The Shifting City
Mumbai
Curated by Kaiwan Mehta
74
Poetry
In this room, the poems come and go
Poems by Sarabjeet Garcha
Section curated by Ranjit Hoskote
Photos by Chirodeep Chaudhuri
78
Domus Milan
Room for diversity
Text by Winy Maas
80
Landscape
Humour, please
The work of Claude Cormier
Canada and USA
Text by Christiane Bürklein
Photos by Nicola Betts, Marc Cramer, Neil Fox,
Industryous Photography, Jean-François Savaria,
Jean-Michel Seminaro
88
Architecture
German birdcages
Misguided German rigour
Germany
Text by Klaus Englert
Photos by Steffi Loos, Stefan Müller,
George Messaritakis, Jörg Zägel, Rüdiger
Wölk, Michael Kappeler
96
Under construction
Parametric souk
Beirut Souks
Beirut, Lebanon
Project by Zaha Hadid Architects,
SKP — Samir Khairallah and Partners
Photo by Diego Ibarra Sánchez
Yann Arthus-Bertrand
98
Cinema
Adding capacity
Doctor Strange
Director Scott Derrickson
Production company Marvel Studios
100
Urbanism
NYC: trees are finally coming!
NYC Urban Forest
New York City, USA
Text by Stephanie Carlisle, Nicholas Pevzner
Photos by D aniel Avila, Richard Baker,
Richard Hallet, Malcolm Pinckney
108
Rassegna
Compact Living
Presented by Giulia Guzzini
Cover Design:
Designed by Delhi-based Anagram Architects, the Pavilion at Cabral Yard during the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2018 was activated to perform as a island-hub for art with people. It was meant to be a space which lets its inhabitants and users know that they had control over it and not the other way around. The Pavilion was built in a way so as to ‘unpack’ the programming and scatter it across the site , thereby allowing greater visual intrusion, and attempting to ‘unbox’ the art of the Biennale. For more details turn to page 46.
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